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Escapee caught 16 years after Texas prison break
Feb 7, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 7, 2013 Houston Chronicle

A man who escaped from a Texas prison 16 years ago has been captured in Mexico, authorities said Wednesday.

Juan Salaz, an American citizen, was captured last week and remains in Mexico awaiting extradition, authorities said.

Salaz escaped on March 22, 1997 from the Garza East Unit in Beeville, southeast of San Antonio. He was serving three concurrent 35 years sentences for two counts of attempted capital murder of a police officer and aggravated kidnapping with a deadly weapon.

He climbed over three 16-foot razor wire topped security fences.

DNA evidence helps solve murder - 1968
Feb 7, 2013, - 0 Comments

evidence

by Michael Thomas Barry

On February 7, 1968, Bernard Josephs returns to his house in Bromley, England, and finds his wife Claire lying under their bed, her throat slashed and severed to the spine. Defensive wounds to her hands appeared to be caused by a serrated knife. No weapon was found at the house, and police had no other clues to go on.

Dalton Gang Attempts First Train Robbery - 1891
Feb 6, 2013, - 0 Comments

dalton gang

Dalton Gang wanted poster

by Michael Thomas Barry

On February 6, 1891, members of the Dalton Gang commit their first train robbery in California. Bob, Emmett, and Grat Dalton were only three of Lewis and Adeleine Dalton's 10 sons. The brothers grew up on a succession of Oklahoma and Kansas homesteads during the post-Civil War period, when the region was awash in violence lingering from the war and notorious outlaw bands like the James-Younger Gang.

Leaked Obama administration memo sets out case for killing US citizens
Feb 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 5, 2013 Guardian

The detailed circumstances in which a US government may order the killing of an American citizen who is a high-ranking member of al-Qaida have been revealed in a leaked memo prepared by Obama administration lawyers.

The document, acquired by NBC and dating from 2011, lays out for the first time the precise rationale for carrying out targeted killings of senior al-Qaida members who are US citizens, and who are believed to pose an "imminent threat of violent attack" against Amercia.

Although the white paper deals specifically with the issue of when and how the president can order the killing of a US citizen who is a member of al-Qaida, it also provides one of the most comprehensive accounts of the wider international legal framework the US believes supports its controversial drones policy.

Although the paper does not specify the "minimum legal requirements" for launching such an operation, it insists that the killing would be constitutionally justified as the United States is engaged in an "armed conflict", as defined by international law and authorised by Congress, with al-Qaida and its affiliates.

In a key passage in the document – which is unsigned – it argues that for a US citizen who has rights under the due process clause and the fourth amendment, "that individual's citizenship would not immunise from a lethal operation".

Byron Beckwith is convicted of the assassination of Civil Rights leader Medger Evers - 1994
Feb 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

Beckwith

Byron Beckwith

by Michael Thomas Barry

On February 5, 1994, Byron de la Beckwith is convicted of the assassination of civil rights leader Medger Evers. The assassination had taken place 31 years earlier, ending the lengthiest murder case in American history. Evers was gunned down in the driveway of his Jackson, Mississippi, home while his wife, Myrlie, and the couple's small children were inside waiting for their father.

Organized crime gangs tried to fix hundreds of soccer matches, agency says
Feb 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 5, 2013 Associated Press

THE HAGUE, Netherlands • Organized crime gangs have fixed or tried to fix hundreds of soccer matches around the world in recent years, including World Cup and European Championship qualifiers and two Champions League games, Europol announced Monday.

The European Union’s police agency said an 18-month review found 380 suspicious matches in Europe and another 300 questionable games outside the continent, mainly in Africa, Asia and South and Central America. It also found evidence that a Singapore-based crime syndicate was involved in some of the match-fixing.

Europol refused to name any suspected matches, players, officials or match-fixers, saying that would compromise national investigations, so it remained unclear how much of the information divulged Monday was new or had already been revealed in trials across the continent.

Even so, the picture painted by Europol was the latest body blow for the credibility of sports in general, following cyclist Lance Armstrong’s admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs in all seven of his Tour de France wins.

“This is a sad day for European football (soccer),” Europol Director Rob Wainwright told reporters. He said criminals were cashing in on soccer corruption “on a scale and in a way that threatens the very fabric of the game.”

Europol said 425 match officials, club officials, players and criminals from at least 15 countries were involved in fixing European soccer games dating back to 2008.

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