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1990 murder continues to divide rural Mo. town; freed suspect hopes 3rd trial will clear name
Mar 6, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 6, 2013 Fox News

A hero's welcome greeted Mark Woodworth when he walked out of prison after a judge said he could return home while awaiting a third murder trial in his Missouri neighbor's 1990 death.

Woodworth appreciates the flowers and balloons, but says he wants more: The chance to finally clear his name in a case that has long divided the northern Missouri town of Chillicothe.

Woodworth was 16 when Cathy Robertson was shot and killed in her sleep. Her husband Lyndel Robertson was shot several times but survived.

Woodworth was first convicted in 1995, briefly released on appeal but then convicted by a second jury in 1999 and sentenced to life in prison.

The Missouri Supreme Court overturned his conviction in January over evidence it said his lawyers never received.

The trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg begins - 1951
Mar 6, 2013, - 0 Comments

rosenberg

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

by Michael Thomas Barry

On March 6, 1951, the trial of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg begins in New York. Judge Irving R. Kaufman presides over the espionage prosecution of the couple accused of selling nuclear secrets to the Russians (treason could not be charged because the U.S. was not at war with the Soviet Union).

Zimmerman Stuns Court, Waives Right to 'Stand Your Ground' Hearing in Trayvon Martin Case
Mar 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 5, 2013 ABC News

George Zimmerman's attorneys stunned court observers Tuesday when they waived their client's right to a "Stand Your Ground" hearing slated for April that might have led to a dismissal of the charges in the shooting death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin a year ago.

However, the defense lawyers didn't say whether they would waive the immunity hearing outright. They left open the possibility for that hearing to be rolled into Zimmerman's second degree murder trial. Zimmerman, a former neighborhood watch captain in his Florida subdivision, shot and killed the teen, who was visiting a house in the area.

The move allows the defense more time to prepare for the trial this summer, but also raises the stakes.

Florida's controversial "Stand Your Ground" law entitles a person to use deadly force if he believes his life is threatened, and absolves them of an obligation to retreat from a confrontation, even if retreat is possible.

In recent weeks, the Zimmerman defense has suffered several legal setbacks. Judge Debra Nelson has ruled in favor of the state that Zimmerman's bail conditions should not be loosened, and that Trayvon Martin family attorney Benjamin Crump was not required to sit for a deposition about his interactions with the state's most important witness, a young woman who was the last known person to speak with Trayvon Martin before his death on February 26 2012.

The 10 Greatest Heists in History
Mar 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 5, 2013 policymic.com

We have a strange history of idolizing criminal masterminds. Even thieves who don’t necessarily share their robbed riches with the poor still seem to retain the adoration of fans who live vicariously through their daring escapades. 

As technology and security evolve, so does the criminal guile that seeks to fleece hidden treasures — it's the darker half of innovation, creating a balanced Ying-Yang of wealth. American industries flourished with the advent of train transportation, until they had to contend with the ferocious Jesse James gang. Large banks responsible for the 1920s Depression fell victim to John Dillinger's string of robberies and drew little sympathy from people who held them accountable for the economic collapse. It’s unlikely we’ll see someone give Goldman Sachs their just desserts, but just this February a crew in Brussels proved massive diamond heists are still very much in fashion.

History has taught us that no matter how big the trap, there’s always a sneaky mouse willing to steal the cheese. Here are some of history's greatest heists.

Arrest Warrant is Issued for Jim Morrison - 1969
Mar 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

morrison

Jim Morrison

by Michael Thomas Barry

On March 5, 1969, the Dade County Sheriff's Office issues an arrest warrant for Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors. He is charged with a single felony count and three misdemeanors for his stage antics at a Miami concert a few days earlier.

Murder by Police Misconduct Merely a Misdemeanor...in Milwaukee
Mar 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

Dirty and Deadly (illustration by Eponymous Rox)

by Eponymous Rox

Murder resulting from police misconduct and brutality amounts to only a misdemeanor, the shocked residents of Milwaukee, Wisconsin have recently discovered.

That apparently also extends to killer cops who conspire to hide their crime, obstruct investigations, and commit perjury once dragged kicking and screaming into a courtroom.

Sadder still is that even this tiny measure of justice could only be afforded through a last-minute offer of immunity to two other MPD officers who’d either joined in the illegal police action in 2011 or witnessed it, but never before admitted being present at the scene.

The shifty pair provided testimony against a trio of MPD’s uniformed thugs who, even under oath, continue to insist they “didn’t notice” 22-year-old Derek Williams struggling to breathe after they roughed him up during a false arrest. Nor did they hear any of his urgent pleas for medical attention.

Those would be officers Hear No, See No and Speak No, of course. (No relation to each other.)

Casey Anthony Forced Out of Hiding
Mar 4, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 4, 2013 Good Morning America

A rattled Casey Anthony tried to hide her face today as she waded through a mob of photographers and reporters when she arrived at federal court in Tampa for a meeting in her bankruptcy case, her first public appearance since she was acquitted of killing her daughter Caylee in 2011.

Anthony clung to the man who exited the car with her as someone shouted repeatedly, "Did you get away with murder?"

She clutched a black floppy hat and a pair of sunglasses near her face and looked shaken up as she was surrounded. Her brown hair was loose, just below her shoulders and she wore a long black sweater, black pants and a printed blouse.

Today marks Anthony's first public appearance after more than two years in hiding.

Anthony, 26, has been unemployed for the past four years and filed for bankruptcy in January. She's almost $800,000 in debt and has less than $1,100 worth of assets, according to her bankruptcy filing.

She is scheduled to appear in federal court in Tampa, Fla., this afternoon. Anthony has not made any public appearances since her 2011 acquittal in the alleged murder of her 2-year-old daughter Caylee.

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