Historical Crimes

Apr 5, 2013
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From George Washington through Ulysses S. Grant, U.S. presidents followed a relentless policy of removing Native Americans from their lands. President Andrew Jackson codified ethnic cleansing into law when he signed the Indian Removal Act in 1830. by David Robb In 1830...
Feb 25, 2013
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Five months after the author’s grandfather was sentenced to only 10 years for the shooting death of his father in Fall River, Massachusetts, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. Was Lizzie inspired by the...
Dec 10, 2012
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Mary Rogers  The disappearance and murder of Mary Rogers in 1841 became a major tabloid story for the New York newspapers. Edgar Allan Poe wrote a mystery story about it, but Mary’s murderer was never identified.          by Doug...
Nov 26, 2012
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Of all the infamous outlaws of the Old West, none has quite the notoriety of “Billy the Kid.” by Robert Walsh John Wesley Hardin. Jesse James. Cole Younger. “Curly” Bill Brocius. Gunslingers, killers, thieves, icons of the Wild West. Of all the infamous outlaws of the Old...
Aug 6, 2012
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Charles Ponzi Charles Ponzi, a poor immigrant from Lugo, Italy, pulled off an amazing investment scam in 1920 that defrauded U.S. investors of $20 million ($240 million in today’s money).  In the process, he perfected the infamous “Ponzi Scheme” that was taken to new...
Jul 9, 2012
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John Wesley Hardin John Wesley Hardin was one of the most violent and heartless gunslingers of the Old West. He was also a narcissistic braggart, a pathological liar, and an unrepentant racist. Most of all he was a coldblooded killer.  by Robert Walsh Texas. The Lone...
Jun 4, 2012
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John "Babbacombe" Lee After three attempts to hang John Lee at Exeter Prison in Devon, England, the hanging was called off. Years later he was paroled.   by Robert Walsh  It is February 23, 1885. The place is the coach house of Exeter Prison, Devon...
May 28, 2012
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George Metesky For six years during the early 1950s, “The Mad Bomber” terrorized New Yorkers by planting 32 pipe bombs all over Manhattan. Bombs were left at Grand Central Station, Penn Station, The Port Authority, at subway stations, at Radio City Music Hall, at Macy’s, at...
May 14, 2012
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Franklin Benjamin Gowen Patrick H. Campbell makes the case that the death of industrialist Franklin Gowen was a murder, not a suicide. His long investigation into this case was detailed in his book Who Killed Franklin Gowen?  Copies of that book may be purchased by...
Nov 14, 2011
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Marie Besnard In France, in the 17th Century, alchemists became wealthy grinding arsenic rock into a colorless and odorless powder and selling the powder to their countrymen who wanted to do away with a wealthy old parent, grandparent, uncle or aunt. There was even an “...

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